Yangon Post

Let's talk about tea

Let's talk about tea

We Brits are super into tea. We're very particular about it. It's so "British" isn't it? A cuppa with your breakfast, another with your mid-morning garibaldi. Tea and a Twix while you ruminate over a thorny issue.

But what if I told you that tea is even more Burmese to the Burmese than British to the Brits? 

Read more

Prints for Myanmar

Prints for Myanmar

Here is a nice way you can support Burma while it goes through this period of struggle. Saving Myanmar has been set up by a group of photographers who have lived in Myanmar over the past 8 years. They are selling limited editions of 10 prints of a beautiful selection of photographs.

Below are some of my favourites, but click the button at the bottom to see them all.

Read more

We're back on the waves

We're back on the waves

I can hardly believe I'm writing this, but our container finally left Yangon on Wednesday. 

This is the third time I've had this feeling in the last year. The first was...

Read more

Inside Kalinko Homes

Inside Kalinko Homes

We want to turn the spotlight on the people without whom Kalinko would not exist. The people who enable us to do what we do. The people whose support means we can support all of our makers.

It's time to tell our customers' stories.

Starting with Sarah. 

Read more

Update // Have we normalised what's happening?

Update // Have we normalised what's happening?

Myanmar may have permanently left the Western media, and some level of normality is resuming in Yangon, but part of this is that we have all normalised what is happening. 16 people have been killed by the military since last week and another 308 arrested. Imagine if these were stats from the UK: 16 Brits killed by the British Army, and 308 in Pentonville Prison for peacefully protesting. That alone would be cause for some sort of revolution, let alone the 756 killed before this, and the 4809 behind bars. However, seen in the context of the coup so far, things do seem to be calming down.

Read more

See this big pile of rattan?

See this big pile of rattan?

It's about to become hundreds and hundreds of bins. Bins and trays and bowls. Oh, and placemats, and planters, umbrella stands and side tables. And did we say laundry bins? Piles of laundry bins for piles of laundry.

We're making as many as we can, because we know you're waiting for them. In the meantime...

Read more

An update // And some good news

An update // And some good news

I’ve been thinking a lot this week about people’s tolerance for bad news. There’s only so much people can take.

Yesterday marked 80 days since the military coup. 80 days of bad news. 80 days of people waking up in Myanmar and remembering what has happened. Twelve weeks of our emails focussing on what’s going on.

And we aren’t going to stop, partly because this isn’t the kind of situation where you can seek out silver linings, and also because it’s so important that people stay on top of what’s going on. But we’re going to allow some space for good news too...

Read more

An update // Death toll is now over 700

An update // Death toll is now over 700

Yesterday was the start of Thingyan, Myanmar’s annual holiday and the start of the Burmese New Year. Usually there would have been festivals in all the streets, huge water fights all over the country, and a week’s holiday to recover with friends and family. But this year nobody is celebrating. People are purposely avoiding anything which acknowledges normal life, as life is currently so far from normal. The clay pots in the above photo are usually placed on thresholds to welcome in the new year. But yesterday, people marched in the streets with them full of flowers and painted with revolutionary slogans, peacefully protesting for the 72nd day in a row.

Read more

An update // Are you still following?

An update // Are you still following?

“There are all kinds of bombs going off today,” said a friend in Yangon yesterday morning, the city under no less strain than it was last week. Some of these ‘bombs’ are grenades, some are noise bombs, some are unidentified. Whatever they are, the atmosphere is tense.

For those who have missed it in the news, Burma’s military took control of the country in a coup on February 1st. 

We have been sending out weekly updates on the situation as it unfolds. Here is this week's. 

Read more